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Johns Hopkins Medicine YouTube Channel

It’s amazing how many resources I have been discovering at Johns Hopkins. I work within one small part of Johns Hopkins Medicine and have been discovering the many resources across the larger organization available to both staff and the public. One I recently discovered is the Johns Hopkins Medicine YouTube channel, which I would like to share with my readers. I embedded just a few examples from the channel below.

The Johns Hopkins Medicine channel has many more interesting and informative videos. The link has also been added to the Free e-Learning page.

A Great Example of Using Multiple Forms of Media

Last year “We Choose the Moon” was launched in celebration of the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch. This is a fantastic example of using video, audio, photos, and animation all in one course. Here is the link, www.wechoosethemoon.org. It is absolutely worth the visit.

Also, here is a video from AdobeTV that provides some background on the development of “We Choose the Moon.”

http://tv.adobe.com/assets//swf/player.swf

If you liked this course, you will also like these courses on space and NASA.

Explore the Apollo 11 Landing Site – NASA

International Space Station – NASA

One Small Step – NASA

NASA 50 Years – NASA

Rocket Science 101 – NASA

A Sense of Scale – The Elegant Universe

Trace Space Back to You – NASA

And there are plenty more on the Free e-Learning page.

For Those of Us Who Didn't Get a Google Wave Invite

If you did not get a Wave invite, but would like to get a peek at it, here are few videos from those that did get invites.

And here is the Google Wave team on launch day.

FYI: If anyone out there still has a Wave invite, I am still interested in receiving one. Thanks!

Using Screenr to Create a Video Post

With all the hub-bub around Screenr, I had to check it out. It is extremely easy to use. If you have not heard about it yet, Screenr gives you the ability to capture your computer screen, mouse movements and audio (e.g. software simulations).  Once you click done, it compiles it and sends it and your text description out as a tweet.

While I was playing around with it, I realized I can capture my webcam on it…what an easy way to create a video post that I can tweet.  Here is the result of a 2 minute investment of time.
http://screenr.com/Content/assets/screenr_0817090731.swf
If you would like to see it in my Twitter timeline, you will find me at http://twitter.com/minutebio (@minutebio).

Developing With Flash Lite Video Series

Dale Rankine recently launched the first video of his video training series for Flash mobile developers. If you are interested in developing with Flash Lite, say m-learning, you will want to check this out. The videos are developed for delivery on Adobe TV, but he is also making them available on Vimeo. Here the link, http://vimeo.com/adobeflashlite.

I am looking forward to seeing more of these videos and will be adding this to my Free e-Learning page, of course.

Descend into a Black Hole

Here is a great video on what it would be like to descend into a black hole. Yes, I am an astronomy nut and I love educational videos/animation. Plus, it comes from my alma mater, University of Colorado at Boulder. So, when I saw this video and the great stuff coming out of Jila at CU, I had to share it.

The video contains insets that include a map of the trajectory and a clock that displays the time left until central singularity, where space and time come to an end. In e-learning central singularity is 1 continual hour of clicking next buttons. Had to throw that in.

Here are all the details of the science behind this video – http://jilawww.colorado.edu/~ajsh/insidebh/schw.html.

US Army Using Interactive Videos

Here is an article on one way the army is using videos in online learning. http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/05/15/soldiers.videogames/index.html

They are creating “immersive cultural simulation” programs, which uses realistic video created in California, but also combines it with actual footage from Iraq. They make an important point in the article that “…soldiers relate more to human characters than virtual avatars.” I would think this is extremely important when it comes to cultural sensitivity, which they are using the simulations for. Bottom line, they are presented with a realistic video depicting a scenario where they must make a choice and then shown the results of their choice. Not a terribly complex design, but probably effective.