Tag Archive | Tools

The Johns Hopkins Medicine Simulation Center

Last week, I had the pleasure of touring the Johns Hopkins Medicine Simulation Center. This is a training center that uses numerous types of simulations – everything from live actors to mannequin and online sims. As I toured the center, I tweeted a few pictures and some notes, which I am sharing below.

Observation Area

Simulation Center's observation area for proctors.

Simulation Center Examination Area

Looking into one of the Simulation Center's examination rooms from observation area.

Simulation Center's Operating Room

Simulation Center's Operating Room

 

Simulation Center Operating Room Mannequin

Simulation Center Mannequin. They breathe, move, bleed, have a pulse, specific medical issues, etc. (the center has 20 total mannequins).

Programming the Simulation Center Infant Mannequin

Programming the Simulation Center's Infant Mannequin

Infant  Mannequin

Infant Mannequin - These can also be delivered from a female mannequin including simulating a multiple births.

The Simulation Center is an extremely impressive training center and I was very pleased to have the opportunity to get a tour. You can learn more about the center at the following link – Johns Hopkins Medicine Simulation Center.

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I Saw a Virtual Patient at MedBiquitous

I am currently attending the MedBiquitous conference, which is hosted at Johns Hopkins (my employer) and focuses on how learning technologies can transform heath care education. Today, I attended some great sessions including one on using virtual patients in training. Several organizations shared the tools used develop these virtual worlds. One, CliniSpace, had a nice interface and from the demo appears to have an easy to use authoring mode. I was also impressed on how authors can quickly add or change scenarios on the fly during a simulation. Below is a video that gives a glance at CliniSpace’s virtual world and its patients, doctors, nurses, etc.

I am looking forward to seeing more exciting things at the next two days of the MedBiquitous conference. I am also tweeting (@minutebio) some of what I learn at the conference via its #medbiq2012 hash tag.

Deconstructing My #DemoFest Course – Part 3 (Development) #DevLearn

Of the questions asked of me during DemoFest, I think most were regarding development tools. In regards to development tools used, the course is truly a Frankencourse, a term I believed coined by David Anderson (@eLearning).

So here are the development tools I used for this project.

Adobe Flash – The initial interface was built in Flash. This provided greater ease of animating the characters, creating the navigation, which is non-linear and not as simple as adding next and back buttons of which it has none. However, the Flash movie sits within Articulate Presenter and navigates to an assessment made in Articulate Quizmaker which also sits within the same Presenter project (more on this later).

Adobe Captivate – I used this for creating every simulation in the course. I find Captivate to be a great tool for software simulations, plus I could easily edit instructions in the sims, add graphics including the Captain and Ossie 7. It also afforded me the opportunity to have several sims be more exploration than just task driven. For example, the sim where Ossie 7 lets you explore each ribbon at your own pace and direction. Note: All the sims are “try me” sims in which the participant completes tasks and/or explores the application. They are not demonstrations were they simply watch the application being used.

Articulate Quizmaker – Very easy way to create the assessment at the conclusion of the course. Most of the questions in the quiz were scenario based and  involved clicking the correct button on a graphic representation of the Office application (e.g., an Outlook ribbon). Quizmaker easily accommodated this, plus worked well within Presenter – it should since it is also part of the Articulate suite.

Articulate Presenter – This is what I plopped the Flash and Quizmaker into. Essentially, the first page of the Presenter project is the Flash course, which has numerous pages and opens all the sims and links to its additional resources. It also has a button that takes you to the quiz. It actually takes you to the next presenter page introducing the quiz. The third page is the Quizmaker assessment. And because it is in Presenter, I could easily publish the presenter course as SCORM compliant that would work well on my learning management system (LMS).

Social Media – Ongoing support includes the use of social media, including TwitterScreenr videos, and Diigo social bookmarks.

That’s it. I know to some it may seem insane to use so many tools, but with so many different aspects of the course it did require these tools to get this project done. Don’t believe me? Take a look – Introduction to Office 2010.

Note: Microsoft Office 2010 was used to the extent that it was the subject of the sims, job aids, etc., but not actually a development tool itself.

View the course – Introduction to Office 2010

Cool Tools to Liven Up The Classroom

I just read an article in T&D Magazine titled “Beef Up Your Training Toolbox with Web Tool.” The author, Mary E. Green, offered suggestions for how you can use web tools to increase engagement in the traditional classroom. The article inspired me to look at what is on my Cloud Apps page that may also be helpful to the classroom trainer. Here is what I pulled from the page that I think would be great to use in the traditional classroom. Plus, they are all free.

Cartoons (also suggested by Green) – A funny cartoon can liven up the class. The following allow you to make your own that you can use in the classroom.
DoInk
ToonDoo

Charts, Diagrams, and Data – Explain it in a chart using the apps below. Plus, you will be surprised how much supporting information you may find in the Google Public Data Explorer.
Cacoo (create diagrams)
ChartGo (create charts)
Google Public Data Explorer (Create charts and visualizations form public data)

QR Code Generators – Put QR codes in your manuals and on the classroom screen. They can contain text or URLs and is a great way to get additional information and resources to attendees with smart phones.
Kaywa
Snap.vu
YouScan.me

Screencasts – Software trainers, show them how it is done in a screencast that can be shared in the classroom and also accessed later at their convenience. Heck, give them the screencast’s link via a QR code while you are at it. Participants can create their own and use them to share their new skills with others.
Screen-o-Matic
Screenr

Social Bookmarking – Make sure they have all your online resources by giving them one link to all your bookmarks. Plus, when you add additional resources at a later time, they will see them too.
Delicious
Digg
Diigo
Linkpad.me

Social Media – Get a back channel going in the classroom and keep it posted on the screen. Plus, what a great way to continue supporting learners by interacting via social media after the class ends.
Twitter
Yammer
Storify (create stories using social media)

Video – Create your own video and post it, find relevant videos already out there, and/or get your learners to make and share their own video.
TeacherTube
YouTube

These are just the apps I pulled from the Cloud App page. Do you have suggestions of where classroom trainers can find useful online tools for the classroom? If so, feel free to add them to the comment section.

Dabbling in QR Codes

Diigo QR CodeTag

I have been hearing so much talk, and seeing use, of QR Codes lately. Maybe I am noticing it more because I started dabbling in them myself or maybe they are on the rise. Either way, I want to share a few things about QR Codes. First off if you do not know what they are, here is a quick definition:

QR Code is a specific matrix bar code (or two-dimensional code), readable by dedicated QR bar code readers and camera phones. The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on a white background. The information encoded can be text, URL or other data.
Source: Wikipedia

To simplify, with a QR Code reader on your smart phone you can use the phone’s camera to scan the QR Code (like the crazy black and white thing at the top of this page) and it will take you to a web page, display text, phone number and/or prepare a text message to be sent.

The great thing is they are extremely easy to create and use in your online learning or in the traditional classroom. Using a QR Code generator (e.g., Kaywa, Snap.vu, etc.), you can create and copy the code to a web page, PowerPoint slide, add it to a manual, print it, etc. Now when it is seen in your classroom or online course participants can scan the QR Code and visit the site, obtain the text info or data.

Here is a demo showing how easy it is to generate a QR Code.

http://screenr.com/Content/assets/screenr_1116090935.swf

Here are a few ways I am starting to use QR Codes:

  • Adding my contact information to my classroom powerpoints and manuals. I even posted one with my contact info outside my office.
  • Include QR Codes in manuals and job aids that take the user to relevant URLs.
  • Adding codes in e-learning courses. For example. the video below shows one in a course that directs the user to social bookmarks containing additional resources and tutorials.

See an example of a QR Code in a WBT course.

Here are also my QR Codes bookmarks where you will find more resources on this subject including links to QR Code generators. Of course the QR Code for this link is below too.

Diigo QR CodeTag

Quiz Maker Pro Give Away

ProProfs has been nice enough to give one of our lucky readers a free copy of Quiz Maker Pro. They created a sample quiz, which if you score 100% you will be included in our drawing for a free one year copy. Below is the link to the quiz, which will give you a good feel of what can be done with Quiz Maker in addition to moving you closer to winning your free copy for one year.

How Teachers Can Use Web 2.0 In The Classroom (Quiz Maker)

The deadline is December 27, 2010. I will select a name from all who scored 100% and announce the lucky winner December 29th right here on this blog.

Good luck!

Frankenstein Course Development

Frankenstein 1910

I am currently creating a course and as usual it involves numerous development tools. This course consists of using three main tools. Here they are and why I am using them.

Adobe Flash – My favorite tool of choice. I like its flexibility in making the interactive assets I need for the course and not being constrained by prepackaged interactives that come with many e-learning development tools. In this case I am making the course itself in Flash. This includes each page, characters, animation, and interactive elements with the exception of the software simulations (sims) and the final assessment/quiz.

Adobe Captivate – The course will contain many “try me” sims for a software upgrade in which we are implementing. I am developing these in Captivate, which in my opinion is the best out there for creating software sims. Each sim will launch in a new window from the Flash course. Keeping these in a separate folder and launched as individual SWFs will also help keep the file size and load time down.

ArticulatePresenter and Quizmaker are providing the assessment and an ease of packaging it as a SCORM compliant course. What I like is the ease of developing an assessment in Quizmaker. In this case I will take my Flash course and import the SWF to the first page of Articulate Presenter. A single button in my menu, called Knowledge Check, will move the user from the Presenter page containing the course SWF to the second page where the assessment begins. The ability to have a Flash button, or menu, work within Presenter was the kicker. This allowed me to get the best of both worlds; Flash and using Articulate to create the assessment and SCORM packaging. Here is a tutorial from Screenr that shows how you can make a Flash menu that will change slides in Presenter.